Australia’s only multicultural film festival connects filmmaker to her Cypriot roots

Australia’s only multicultural film festival connects filmmaker to her Cypriot roots

Cypriot-Australian writer and filmmaker Koraly Dimitriadis grew up in Melbourne’s inner northern suburbs in what she describes as working-class migrant culture.

In childhood, she remembers her dad talking about the politics of her homeland, sharing their sense of struggle to make ends meet and to live in and understand a country that was so different to what they knew.

“It just felt like something wasn’t right,” Dimitriadis said. “But I didn’t realise what it was or how to articulate it until much later in life.”

Australia’s only multicultural film festival connects filmmaker to her Cypriot roots

The IF Team·

HotWares

·August 8, 2023

SPONSORED

Cypriot-Australian writer and filmmaker Koraly Dimitriadis grew up in Melbourne’s inner northern suburbs in what she describes as working-class migrant culture.

In childhood, she remembers her dad talking about the politics of her homeland, sharing their sense of struggle to make ends meet and to live in and understand a country that was so different to what they knew.

“It just felt like something wasn’t right,” Dimitriadis said. “But I didn’t realise what it was or how to articulate it until much later in life.”

As a poet, filmmaker, and writer Dimitriadis brings this cultural complexity to her art.

Her latest short film Yiayia (my grandmother) recounts her Cypriot grandmother’s story.

Set in the ancient Paphos Theatre, which has not seen a performance in over a thousand years, the film explores the heartache of the migrant experience across three generations of women.

Yiayia (my grandmother) is a finalist in the Best Short Film Non-Fiction category at this year’s Multicultural Film Festival (MFF). The film will also screen in Cyprus in November as part of the Australian Embassy’s 50-year celebrations.

That’s what Australia’s only multicultural film festival means to filmmakers – it’s not only about showcasing storytelling skills, but connecting storytellers to their cultural backgrounds.

This is not the first time Dimitriadis has entered MFF; her film Mediterranean Madness was a finalist in 2022. She says the festival has given her the courage to explore and experiment with her filmmaking and is an essential platform for culturally diverse voices.

“I came to art later in life.

“I did the good Greek girl thing first.

“Got married young, had kids, and became a computer programmer.

“This festival helps recognise and support migrants, especially women; we desperately need that support.

“We need women’s voices talking about taboo subjects, things that can sometimes be kept behind closed doors in migrant communities.”

Dimitriadis tells the story of her grandmother’s intergenerational trauma with the help of her teenage daughter Rosie G, a cinematographer in the film.

“It’s her first official credit, and I am so proud of how it helped her creatively blossom.”

The MFF premiere of Yiayia (my grandmother) will be held at ACMI in Melbourne’s Federation Square on August 29. Public ticket sales are now open.

www.multiculturalcommission.vic.gov.au/multicultural-film-festival

Michael Yiakoumi

Michael Yiakoumi

Leave a Replay

Sign up for our Newsletter

Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit